The whitsun weddings philip larkin

He is too aloof from the audience he wants to communicate with. As the afternoon wears on and the train speeds through the countryside, these sites are replaced by stretches of farmland, industrial canals and another town that looks like the last one.

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Stanza 7 It is worth noting that more personality is given to the inanimate British countryside — of which we get only description — than is giving to the people that Larkin strove to describe. His next thought is how all the mothers of the brides share the common physical trait of being overweight; how yellow, purple and green are the hot colors of the moment; and how every single wedding party seems to include a dirty-minded uncle somewhere. Philip Larkin In the beginning the poet seems to be showing a kind of hatred for marriage or the newly married couples. England poetry, in particular nature poetry, had been built on this idea of the English countryside. The shift from a mostly-rural to a mostly-urban economy was also something that Larkin touched upon, as well as the idea of Britain being a little bit outdated in terms of technology and innovation. Shrestha, Roma. It has always been supposed the poem was based on an actual train journey Larkin made in on Whitsun Saturday, a day which was popular for weddings at that time [1] though since there was a rail strike on that weekend Larkin scholar John Osborne now thinks the journey an unlikely one to have taken place. Larkin was born in , Coventry and went to Oxford. The speaker seems to be describing them from an omniscient standpoint, however the attempt to describe them in broad terms, and the use of the plural form, is reductive in its capacity. The last two sentences bring the journey to a close and all the young lovers disappear into the clouds never to be seen again in an arrow-shower.

The important moment in the poem comes when newly married couples board on the train. Similarly, the ceremony of marriage is described here as a religious wounding, meaning that the ceremony would subsequently turn out to be a painful affair.

As the train begins to move well past being only a quarter full, the speaker ponders how none of the grooms and their brides ever stop to contemplate how they will share something with each of the other newly wedding couples for as long as their marriage lasts. And then, amid a hail of confetti and last minute advice, the bride and groom were waved goodbye on the train platform.

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Wide farms went by, short-shadowed cattle, and Canals with floatings of industrial froth; A hothouse flashed uniquely: hedges dipped And rose: and now and then a smell of grass Displaced the reek of buttoned carriage-cloth Until the next town, new and nondescript, Approached with acres of dismantled cars.

Wide farms went by, short-shadowed cattle, and Canals with floatings of industrial froth; A hothouse flashed uniquely: hedges dipped And rose: and now and then a smell of grass Displaced the reek of buttoned carriage-cloth Until the next town, new and nondescript, Approached with acres of dismantled cars.

Whitsun weddings essay

It is read here [2] by Larkin himself. The first two stanzas … That Whitsun, I was late getting away: Not till about One-twenty on the sunlit Saturday Did my three-quarters-empty train pull out, All windows down, all cushions hot, all sense Of being in a hurry gone. Yeats The Tower, This is a particularly Larkinian trait — objects have a far more involving personality than people, for Larkin. The shift from a mostly-rural to a mostly-urban economy was also something that Larkin touched upon, as well as the idea of Britain being a little bit outdated in terms of technology and innovation. Like with all Larkin poems, The Whitsun Weddings is melancholy and bitter, with a vague sense that nothing will ever be right. In each station and platform the poet witnesses the flow of such newly married couples. The Narrator thinks, for a little bit, about the people and their response to the wedding, cynically breaking them down into their appearances. Are those arrows, and that falling rain, even a veiled allusion to what will happen on the wedding night? Stanza 7 It is worth noting that more personality is given to the inanimate British countryside — of which we get only description — than is giving to the people that Larkin strove to describe.
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A Short Analysis of Philip Larkin’s ‘The Whitsun Weddings’